Related Publications

Defense Business Transformation

By: Jacques Gansler, William Lucyshyn

December 01, 2009

The Department of Defense (DoD) is the largest organization in the world, with operations that span a broad range of agencies, activities, and commands. With an annual budget over $500 billion, DoD employs millions of people that operate worldwide and maintains an inventory system that is an order of magnitude larger than any other in the world. However, the business systems used to manage these resources are outdated and inefficient. DoD relies on several thousand, non-integrated, and non-interoperable legacy systems, that are error prone, redundant, and do not provide the enterprise visibility necessary to make sound management decisions.

Defense Business Transformation

Acquisition of Mine-Resistant, Ambush-Protected (MRAP) Vehicles: A Case Study

By: Jacques Gansler, William Lucyshyn, William Varettoni

March 01, 2010

As the largest and fastest industrial mobilization since World War II, the Mine-Resistant Ambush-Protected (MRAP) vehicle program is a testament to the scale and efficiency possible when government and industry collaborate with a sense of urgency, patriotism, and pragmatism. Public pressure over rising casualty numbers, intense political scrutiny, and support from the highest levels of government all combined into a set of unique circumstances. Given great uncertainty in the nature of future security issues, however, urgent and unforeseen needs will frequently press the procurement system. The MRAP program, precisely because of its size and scope, brings into sharp relief the merits and deficiencies of the current system for rapid acquisitions.

Acquisition Of MRAP Vehicles

Implementing the U.S. Army’s Logistics Modernization Program

By: Jacques Gansler, William Lucyshyn

August 01, 2009

The first Gulf War of the early 1990s revealed the fundamental weaknesses of the Army’s outdated logistics information technology systems. In order to address these problems, the Army has undertaken an aggressive, multi-program effort aimed at adopting best business practices in a Single Army Logistics Enterprise (SALE). SALE represents the Army’s vision for its future logistics enterprise to be fully integrated and based upon collaborative planning, knowledge management, and best business practices (Rhodes 2005). The Logistics Modernization Program (LMP) is a key component of SALE.

Implementing the U.S. Army’s Logistics Modernization Program